What type of modifications will affect my motorhome insurance?

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  1. David says:

    ‘we recommend that all modifications are carried out by a professional’ your words well there’s a subject,I had little run in with a supplier a few years ago who supplied me with an electric motor that turned out to be faulty after I had removed it and taken it back he refused to replace said motor stating that I was not qualified to do such work – even though I had explained to him that as an apprentice trained (7years) engineer with a HND in development engineering and a degree in mechanical engineering and been doing that sort of work all my working life – so it ended in a court, and guess what he got his but kicked. so I just because you don’t work in a particular area does not mean you can not fit equipment.

    • Hi David,

      Many thanks for getting in touch. Whilst you obviously have the expertise to make modifications to your motorhome at home, not everyone does. We recommend all modifications be done by a professional as a preventative measure. If the modification is found to be improperly fitted and proves to be the cause of an accident or damage, the insurance company who paid out on the loss may pursue the negligent party to seek reimbursement.

      Many thanks
      Caravan Guard

      • Andrew Harcourt says:

        I find this ‘MUST be fitted by a professional’ attitude irksome. OK I accept that you say ‘SHOULD’ sometimes. As an electronics engineer with 30 years working in research and development I am irritated that I am supposed to employ someone less able than myself to fit, for instance, an alarm. Don’t we all remember the false alarms given off by cars with badly, professionally, fitted alarms? The reason they did that was because the professionals would use crimp wiring connectors which have a connection resistance. You need to solder all wiring connections in an alarm otherwise it will continually give false alarms. And yet because I am not on some ‘register of approved alarm fitters’ I am not allowed to fit an alarm. I can design them myself, I don’t need to buy one. I designed and built myself a 12v conversion for my scooter when I was 17, I designed and built an electronic ignition for my mini when I was 21, I designed, built and marketed a reversing sensor system in the late 1990s. I sold thousands of them to Rover. However I am not allowed to do anything to my motorhome because I am not a member of this or that trade body. Actually I can, but rumours abound about insurance companies refusing to pay out because of some irrelevant modification, such as not paying for a crash because you have a TV aerial you didn’t tell us about. I hasten to add that I have no reason to think that Caravan Guard would do that but there remains that underlying suspicion.
        ………….I must now spend the morning going over my motorhome and list the modifications. That will fill a sheet of A4. But thank you for this useful post, it is interesting to see that some mods that I thought would increase the premium actually do not. That is encouraging.

  2. Martin Sasmon says:

    I am arranging for Drive Right air suspension to be fitted to my motorhome next month and was wondering if it was necessary to inform the insurance company. I will be in as soon as the work has been completed

  3. richard leadbitter says:

    i found your e mail of great interest in particular the engine mapping of which i have considered fitting, any information on insurance musts i consider to be vital, well done caravan guard.

  4. Mike says:

    Reading your article about retro fitting cruise control brought back memories.. I think i invented it in 1972!. I used to travel up the M1 in an old mini, and to relieve the pressure on my right ankle, I tied a piece of string round the throttle pedal, routed it under the brake pedal, and held the end in my left hand. The string was just enough to hold the pedal in place. When I needed manual control back I just let go of the string! Those were the days. Sorry, just thought I would share that with you and make the insurance mans eyes water 🙂

  5. Nick says:

    Cruise control can be retrofitted even on older vehicles. Try looking at Gold Cruise or Conrad Anderson. I suspect a manufacturer/franchise wouldn’t be so keen to install a factory installation as an accessory, but good luck if they can.

  6. Les says:

    Not so long ago, it would have been unheard of for an insurer to communicate with their customers in this way. Your news and reviews are there to be help full and informative and I am appreciate the effort you put in when I read them . Whilst your chosen news items cannot be all things to all customers, they can certainly be interesting and occasionally inform decision making. The re-mapping item was of particular interest to me – thank you.

  7. Gary says:

    Hi there I do enjoy reading your email you send,even though I’m not insured this yer as the superb “Knaus sun ti” is undercover on blocks with cardboard in the windows,battery’s off,behind locked gates (to much to do and to little time) and needing timing belt,brakes and other important jobs doing all by me.i fitted italian made alloy wheels a few years ago and asked I think it was “frank pickles” he said you don’t need to declare if you had a claim they just wouldn’t pay for the wheels your insurance wouldn’t be void ( is this true ) I was in the motor trade for years so I do everything myself and that’s the only thing missing of our motor home ‘cruise control’ ( electronic ) which will be fitted by me how do you go on when fitting items yourself regarding insurance ? Ps I still have my insurance card from you with the number 0001.

  8. Bob Flewitt says:

    David Beale, those ‘who writes this stuff’ are not so bigotted as to snobbishly believe that everyone is touring in a post 2006 Fiat/Peugeot based turbo diesel. As it happens, I am, but have great respect for those who aren’t, clearly you don’t. Rant over. Great advice by the way CaravanGuard!

  9. Andrew Nicol says:

    I was unaware that cruise control could be retro-fitted, something which I really miss on my 2003 Compass Motorhome. I will enquire about the cost when I next visit the Peugeot garage.

  10. dave beakhust says:

    I have seen it claimed that even fitting a screen camera must be declared. Many motorhome users have these to guard against “contrived” accidents.
    On a motorhome (well,on mine at least) it can be fitted to the screen so that it is entirely behind the rear view mirror, so obscuring the view is not an issue.

    • A windscreen camera is not one you’d need to tell us about Dave. Though if it was permanently fitted and had cost a lot of money, you may wish to relect its value in your motorhome’s sum insured.
      Kind regards
      Caravan Guard

  11. david beale says:

    I guess 99% of British campervans have turbo-diesel engines so retro-fitting a turbocharger or converting to LPG are non-starters. Who writes this stuff?

    • Hi David
      Thanks for the feedback.
      We have customers with motorhomes up to 25 years old. Not all are turbo diesel engined. We have a decent number of customers who have had LPG conversions. We’re trying to cater for all our customers in our blog material.
      Kind regards
      Caravan Guard

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